Wildlife Rescue Magazine

Lazy Oriental small-clawed otter closeup, Epe Zoo - by fchristant -

Lazy Oriental small-clawed otter closeup, Epe Zoo - by fchristant -

I couldn’t resist to share it with you guys

I couldn’t resist to share it with you guys

wildlife, rescue, magazine, Australia natives, endangered species

wildlife, rescue, magazine, Australia natives, endangered species

adoptpets:

Astonishing bravery of boy who risked his life to save baby deer in Bangladesh river by holding it above raging floodwaters

  • Boy called Belal defiantly held the young fawn in one hand above his head
  • Onlookers were unsure whether the boy was going to appear again
  • When he made it to the other side the locals cheered
  • Teenager jumped into river in Noakhali, Bangladesh to save animal

A brave boy fearlessly risked his own life and showed astonishing bravery to save a helpless baby deer from drowning. 

The boy, called Belal and believed to be in his early teens, defiantly held the young fawn in one hand above his head as he plunged through the surging river.

During the ordeal onlookers were unsure whether the boy was going to appear again.

When he finally made it to the other side the locals cheered as the deer was reunited with its family. 

The incident took place in Noakhali, Bangladesh, when the young fawn became separated from its family during torrential rain and fast-rising floods.

Wildlife photographer Hasibul Wahab captured the brave act while visiting on a photography trip.

He said the Noakhali locals lose a lot of deer during the rainy season and that they have to do all they can to protect them.

He said: ‘He was such a brave boy - the river was so full of water and it was high tide so we thought he might drown.

'My friend was even ready to jump into the river to save the boy. But he made it, and when he returned, we thanked the boy.

'There were only five to seven people observe this situation but it was a phenomenal sight.'

zooborns:

Rescued Badgers Snuggle Up at Secret World Wildlife Rescue Center

Secret World Wildlife Rescue, a wildlife rehabilitation center in South West England, is busy taking care of spring’s first badger cubs. The four rescued cubs were all found orphaned or abandoned, but they’re in good hands now.

Learn more at Zooborns.

primatography:

Sloth love!  Yet another baby two toed sloth came to the rescue center a week ago.  In wildlife rescue, sometimes you win and sometimes you lose. Right now this little guy is winning and I want nothing more than for him to continue to grow and be strong.  Estimated to be two weeks old this baby sloth was found abandoned on the ground by their mother with his twin when they were first born.  Sadly his twin never made it to the rescue center.  We never know why the mother abandons them when we receive babies…all we know is that they need our help.  They need warmth, shelter, hydration, food, and love.  Help me help this little baby.  Visit www.kidssavingtherainforest.com for more information.

llbwwb:

PSA:by Wildlife Hotline.Reblog to save Turtles:)

llbwwb:

PSA:by Wildlife Hotline.Reblog to save Turtles:)

archiemcphee:

It’s no secret that the Geyser of Awesome loves a good sweater, particularly when they’re impressively ugly and/or being worn by cute animals. We’ve seen sweaters on Shetland ponies, cats, pugs, turtles, mini pigs, lambs and even snakes. There was also that unforgettably upsetting clown sweater worn by wilwheaton, but let’s try to stay on track.

Let’s talk about penguins, penguins that don’t just look cute in little sweaters, but who desperately need them to help recover from the potentially lethal affects of oil pollution. When their feathers become coated with oil, penguins lose their ability to keep warm. And when they try to preen their dirty feathers they end up ingesting the toxic oil. As a result oiled penguins frequently die from exposure and starvation. The Penguin Foundation at Phillip Island Nature Parks in Victoria, Australia takes in oiled penguins and uses knitted sweaters to keep the birds warm and prevent them from preening until their feathers can be properly cleaned.

And you can help them.

If you’re a knitter you can download the penguin sweater pattern here and send in sweaters. But wait, if you aren’t a knitter but still want to help, you can support the foundation by clicking here to donate or adopt a penguin. Put a penguin in a sweater and you’ve not only made the world a cuter place, you’ve also helped save a penguin.

Click here to learn more about the Penguin Foundation and their awesomely good work.

[via Fashionably Geek]

archiemcphee:

It’s no secret that the Geyser of Awesome loves a good sweater, particularly when they’re impressively ugly and/or being worn by cute animals. We’ve seen sweaters on Shetland ponies, cats, pugs, turtles, mini pigs, lambs and even snakes. There was also that unforgettably upsetting clown sweater worn by wilwheaton, but let’s try to stay on track.

Let’s talk about penguins, penguins that don’t just look cute in little sweaters, but who desperately need them to help recover from the potentially lethal affects of oil pollution. When their feathers become coated with oil, penguins lose their ability to keep warm. And when they try to preen their dirty feathers they end up ingesting the toxic oil. As a result oiled penguins frequently die from exposure and starvation. The Penguin Foundation at Phillip Island Nature Parks in Victoria, Australia takes in oiled penguins and uses knitted sweaters to keep the birds warm and prevent them from preening until their feathers can be properly cleaned.

And you can help them.

If you’re a knitter you can download the penguin sweater pattern here and send in sweaters. But wait, if you aren’t a knitter but still want to help, you can support the foundation by clicking here to donate or adopt a penguin. Put a penguin in a sweater and you’ve not only made the world a cuter place, you’ve also helped save a penguin.

Click here to learn more about the Penguin Foundation and their awesomely good work.

[via Fashionably Geek]

adoptpets:

Astonishing bravery of boy who risked his life to save baby deer in Bangladesh river by holding it above raging floodwaters

  • Boy called Belal defiantly held the young fawn in one hand above his head
  • Onlookers were unsure whether the boy was going to appear again
  • When he made it to the other side the locals cheered
  • Teenager jumped into river in Noakhali, Bangladesh to save animal

A brave boy fearlessly risked his own life and showed astonishing bravery to save a helpless baby deer from drowning. 

The boy, called Belal and believed to be in his early teens, defiantly held the young fawn in one hand above his head as he plunged through the surging river.

During the ordeal onlookers were unsure whether the boy was going to appear again.

When he finally made it to the other side the locals cheered as the deer was reunited with its family. 

The incident took place in Noakhali, Bangladesh, when the young fawn became separated from its family during torrential rain and fast-rising floods.

Wildlife photographer Hasibul Wahab captured the brave act while visiting on a photography trip.

He said the Noakhali locals lose a lot of deer during the rainy season and that they have to do all they can to protect them.

He said: ‘He was such a brave boy - the river was so full of water and it was high tide so we thought he might drown.

'My friend was even ready to jump into the river to save the boy. But he made it, and when he returned, we thanked the boy.

'There were only five to seven people observe this situation but it was a phenomenal sight.'

archiemcphee:

It’s no secret that the Geyser of Awesome loves a good sweater, particularly when they’re impressively ugly and/or being worn by cute animals. We’ve seen sweaters on Shetland ponies, cats, pugs, turtles, mini pigs, lambs and even snakes. There was also that unforgettably upsetting clown sweater worn by wilwheaton, but let’s try to stay on track.

Let’s talk about penguins, penguins that don’t just look cute in little sweaters, but who desperately need them to help recover from the potentially lethal affects of oil pollution. When their feathers become coated with oil, penguins lose their ability to keep warm. And when they try to preen their dirty feathers they end up ingesting the toxic oil. As a result oiled penguins frequently die from exposure and starvation. The Penguin Foundation at Phillip Island Nature Parks in Victoria, Australia takes in oiled penguins and uses knitted sweaters to keep the birds warm and prevent them from preening until their feathers can be properly cleaned.

And you can help them.

If you’re a knitter you can download the penguin sweater pattern here and send in sweaters. But wait, if you aren’t a knitter but still want to help, you can support the foundation by clicking here to donate or adopt a penguin. Put a penguin in a sweater and you’ve not only made the world a cuter place, you’ve also helped save a penguin.

Click here to learn more about the Penguin Foundation and their awesomely good work.

[via Fashionably Geek]